Thursday, November 20, 2008

Review: The Kingdom of the Occult


The Kingdom of the Occult brings up a number of thoughts to my head. Overall this book is a good resource, but things bothered me about it. The first thing I noticed was that though it appears that Walter Martin is the author based on looking at the cover, it was really more of an adaptation of his notes by two other people. This was more of an annoyance than anything, but I will move on. For anyone who has read Walter Martin’s famous book, The Kingdom of the Cults, this book has some advantages and disadvantages. The advantages I find primarily in the “Case Studies” that are in each chapter. Each chapter on a different branch of occult practices has a true story of a person’s experience with that form of the occult. This sheds light on the reality of the occult, which we find so easy to ignore. A disadvantage that arises is that the book is not as clear in its comparisons to Christianity as Cults was. This may be due to the fact that the Occult is more easily distinguished from Christianity than cults are, but either way I found it lacking. Also, different sections (notably the first chapter) are marked by sub-par exegesis in pointing to the truth of Christianity. Although the heart of the authors was clearly good and they were pursuing a worthwhile cause, I found their treatment of Christianity lacking. Overall this book is good and useful (especially when not talking about true Christianity), but not as impressive or comparable to Cults as I had hoped.

6 comments:

Jeremy said...

First I like to say is this book is of good reading. It has helped me in aspecs of answering my questions as I to were dabbling in the occult. Being a 'ghost hunter' wasn't where I was going to find the answers.The authors of Kingdom of the Occults backed with scripture helped me find my way. Not only did I find what I was looking for,but I believe their intent has been met with this message.
Second you say that it lacks true christianity. Would there be a better explenation? Because I'm no judge of men,for I am not going to say that their faith is any less demeaning than mine. But i want to know what you feel on this question.

Wickiser said...

When I speak of the lack of the "truth of Christianity" and not pointing well to "true Christianity," it is speaking entirely of what they state in the book, and not judging their hearts or them. I can see how this book would be helpful in pointing to the truth of Christianity over the Occult, but I don't think they explained Christianity very well.
I do think they did a good job of evaluating the Occult in light of Scripture, but as I was reading, I didn't think they explained Christianity well. I don't think they misrepresented too much, but I'm really picky about theology, and thought their explanations went beyond the basic truths of Christianity and said that some views that are all found throughout the history of the church and considered orthodox are true while excluding others. They didn't stick to the basics, or "Mere Christianity," as C.S. Lewis called it. They wrote as if their views were the basics and no others could be.
After writing all this, I don't want to demean them. They wrote it well, it was well researched, and it is obviously helpful. It doesn't lack "true Christianity" but much of the truth found in it. I felt like they could have done a better job and been more helpful with it.
I'm glad it was helpful to you.

Anonymous said...

This was a very good resource and I read it all the way through. You can actually follow the occult from antiquity to all the strains in the world today.

The two authors, one was Dr. Walter Martin's daughter (a scholar in her own right) and the other was Dr. Walter Martin's long time researcher who assisted him with most of his books over the decades. No problem there.

Anonymous said...

This was a very good resource and I read it all the way through. You can actually follow the occult from antiquity to all the strains in the world today.

The two authors, one was Dr. Walter Martin's daughter (a scholar in her own right) and the other was Dr. Walter Martin's long time researcher who assisted him with most of his books over the decades. No problem there.

Bornbazie said...

Hello :)


I am the author of a book that is well overdue. It is not exactly about magic but does fit in with your inventory. Mode Of living is compiled ancient and contemporary knowledge pieced together for the first time to complete a manual for illumination. The aim for the book is to rewrite failing cultural habits that are destroying the world by prioritising a superficial materialistic existence.

Mode Of Living - the love-based lifestyle uses academic theory to explain New Age claims such as the aura and chakra, while bridging religion and science. It is the first manual for taking care of the material and immaterial aspects of a human being. Mode Of Living supplies the knowledge to expand conscious awareness, enabling an individual to live a more satisfying life. The book is aimed at explaining what a person actually is, and their connection to the universe.

The endless number of diet plans on the market is good evidence that they are all missing something. Conventional living does not teach how we are part of a whole system. By concentrating on sustaining the body you neglect the immaterial body. But what is the immaterial body?

Please visit www.modeofliving.com for more detail.
bornbazie@modeofliving.com

Would you like to review this book?

Kind regards and all the best,

Bornbazie

Anonymous said...

The book was scholarly and well researched and blended the history, content, and apologetics together extremely well. Highly recommended.